The Good Listening To Show: Stories of Distinction & Genius

15 Year Old Motivational Sensation Adarsh Senthilnathan: A Tale of Persistence, Innovation & Youthful Inspiration - Plus the Fascinating Story of a 'Vortex Created with a Coffee Frother' in an Experiment to Remove the Oceon's Microplastics

December 14, 2023 Chris Grimes - Facilitator. Coach. Motivational Comedian
The Good Listening To Show: Stories of Distinction & Genius
15 Year Old Motivational Sensation Adarsh Senthilnathan: A Tale of Persistence, Innovation & Youthful Inspiration - Plus the Fascinating Story of a 'Vortex Created with a Coffee Frother' in an Experiment to Remove the Oceon's Microplastics
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Get ready to be fascinated & intrigued as I converse with my brilliant 15-year-old guest, Adarsh Senthilnathan.  Adarsh got in touch with me out-of-the-blue from his school in Los Angeles, to ask if he could be my Guest to provide him with the platform he felt that  he needed, on his mission to share his inspiration and lessons with the world.

Not your regular teenager, Adarsh sets out to invert the idea that wisdom necessarily comes with age.  Indeed I invite you to listen intently, as Adarsh quickly proves himself to be a youthful and very impressive beacon of wisdom, resilience, insight and innovation indeed.

Adarsh illustrates his unique blend of interests with a seamless blend of soccer, science, and a desire to be of service, to help and inspire others. 

His also has an intriguing & innovative Science Project to his name, involving a bath-full of water, a vortex, some aluminium foil and a coffee-frother, aimed at helping to remove the Ocean's microplastics.

Prepare to be inspired by Adarsh's unwavering spirit as he recounts the hurdles he has already faced and overcome at his youthful age of 15 - and the profound lessons and learnings he already carries with him towards his future. Adarsh's is a future I think we'll all need to keep an eye on! And don't forget you heard him here first!

If you'd like to contact Adarsh to invite him on to YOUR podcast too (which he'd really like you to do!) then you can do so c/o adarshsenthilnathan@gmail.com

 Adarsh's story of personal growth and resilience is a testament to his mindset of determination and consistency. Adarsh effortlessly & very eloquently takes us through the influences that have shaped him: The inspiring journey of his parents from India to America, his admiration for 'norm-breakers', and the motivational power of 'seeing and enjoying others succeed', all play a pivotal role in his life. 

Adarsh also highlights how he leverages social media - and Instagram in particular - as a continuing global source of inspiration and knowledge. 

So, sit back, relax & enjoy! If you're seeking a dose of inspiration, hard work, and an example for us all about "how to make a positive impact and keep going", then listen no further!

You can also Watch/Listen to Adarsh Senthilnathan's extraordinary interview here:

https://vimeo.com/chrisgrimes/adarshsenthilnathan

Tune in next week for more stories of 'Distinction & Genius' from The Good Listening To Show 'Clearing'. If you would like to be my Guest too then you can find out HOW via the different 'series strands' at 'The Good Listening To Show' website.

Don't forget to SUBSCRIBE & REVIEW wherever you get your Podcasts :)

Thanks for listening!

Chris Grimes:

Welcome to another episode of the Good Listening To Show your life and times with me, chris Grimes. The storytelling show that features the clearing, where all good questions come to get asked and all good stories come to be told, and where all my guests have two things in common they're all creative individuals and all with an interesting story to tell. There are some lovely storytelling metaphors a clearing, a tree, a juicy storytelling exercise called 5-4-3-2-1, some alchemy, some gold, a cheeky bit of Shakespeare and a cake. So it's all to play for. So, yes, welcome to the Good Listening To Show your life and times with me, chris Grimes. Are you sitting comfortably here? Then we shall begin. And there we are. Welcome to another exciting episode of the Good Listening To Show Stories of Distinction and Genius, the show in which I invite movers, makers, shakers, mavericks, influencers and also personal heroes into a clearing or serious happy place of their choosing, to all share with us their stories of distinction and genius. And today it's my absolute pleasure to welcome and I hope I'm going to pronounce this correctly a Darsh Centthill Nathan or it could be Centthill Norton, but I think it's a Nathan, is that right?

Adarsh Senthilnathan:

That's correct, yeah.

Chris Grimes:

And a Darsh is a 15-year-old force of nature and a turd of force in that, completely out of the blue, he got in touch from Cerritos High School, which I think is California. Is that correct?

Adarsh Senthilnathan:

Yeah, that's correct.

Chris Grimes:

In the United States, completely unsolicited, saying that he'd love to be on the show because he needs and wants a platform to speak his knowledge and his truth. And the lovely, intriguing thing is that you want to invert the correlation between age and wisdom because although you're only 15, you purport to having almost had two life worths of experience already. So you want a platform in which to speak your truth. I suppose would be a fair way to sum that up.

Adarsh Senthilnathan:

Yeah, that would be great. Thank you for having me.

Chris Grimes:

You're very welcome, Adarsh. So welcome to the show. It's going to be my pleasure to curate you through the journey of it, which I'll explain a bit more in a moment. But if you just like to sort of go back a step, what made you want to get in touch in the first place? And thank you for doing so?

Adarsh Senthilnathan:

Yeah, so I've gained a lot of control over my mind and I've always wanted to help spread the knowledge and the wisdom that I've gained over the years to the people of this world. So I'm just I'm hungry for it. I'm continuing to reach out to podcasts. That I think would be a good fit for me and has an audience that I could really relate to and I could spread my message to in order to help better people's lives, and that's essentially the goal.

Chris Grimes:

And to cut to it, we'll curate you through the journey of it, but what's the big message that you really want to impart?

Adarsh Senthilnathan:

Yeah, the big message that I really just want to get across is just to teach people how to utilize their mind and the things around them to make themselves better, because I feel like nowadays our society is kind of mentally weak and I think that we could really learn a lot by just listening to other people and gaining full control over our mentality and building ourselves up so that we can become successful and we can help our families out, we can help society out and overall it's about personal development and working hard and stuff like that.

Chris Grimes:

And I admire your well, your courage to reach out. And stereotypically in society, somebody at 15 doesn't necessarily have the courage to say I've got a lifetime's worth of wisdom already to be able to want to share my wisdom. So it's a pleasure to have you here to see how your thinking unfolds through the structure of what we're going to be doing, haraj. So at the 10th of age of 15, youth is very much on your side. But what are you currently working on at the moment? Are you at school at the moment? What's happening?

Adarsh Senthilnathan:

Yeah, so I'm currently in 11th grade. Right now, outside of school, I like to play soccer, but in UK terms, football. Currently I've started a science project. I'm working towards getting rid of microplastics within our oceans, and, though the funny thing about that project is obviously I care about the environment, but the main purpose and drive behind me completing that project and getting it out was not so that I could help save the planet. It was more towards so I could gain some credibility in the space, so that when I am reaching out to different podcasts such as yours, I'm not some random 15 year old. At least I'm a 15 year old who has worked towards something and is providing me a.

Chris Grimes:

You're a very bold and majestic 15 year old, if I may say so, because your email was very interesting, very intriguing, Because I do a lot of comedy, improvisation, I've got a mindset of yes and, and normally in life I say yes and work it out later, or I say yes and because it can open up doors with lubricated hinges If you don't say yes. So I'm really open and receptive to that. And also I did really notice that you've already come up with a viable prototype to remove microplastics from the sea, which is quite extraordinary and I enjoyed reading. It says with the help of the vortex and the bubbles, it makes it extraordinarily easy for the microplastic components to stick to the water bubbles that's my lace person's term. So do you want to just describe what your experiment did?

Adarsh Senthilnathan:

Yeah, so essentially what I'm doing is so my project is completely at home, right, I'm not using any lab equipment or anything fancy like that. So what I took was I took an aluminum foil, I wrapped it into a tube and I put some motors on it, and I use Arduino code to engineer the motors. And so essentially what happens is I create a vortex with a coffee frother actually. So the vortex spins all the water with the plastics, and the vibrations from the aluminum foil create waves within the water so that the microplastics naturally make their way towards the middle, and then they can be extracted that way.

Chris Grimes:

And so just using a coffee frother? Is that an extraordinary revealing of the truth? You've solved the oceans microplastics with a coffee frother and a cardboard tube and some aluminum foil.

Adarsh Senthilnathan:

Yeah, that's probably what I'm most proud of with that invention itself was the fact that I didn't spend a lot of money on it. I used stuff from home. So I kind of want to get the message across that you don't need everything, you don't need money, you don't need a lab, you don't need anybody's help. If you actually put your mind to it and you're dedicated to solving a problem and making a solution, it can happen, no matter what resources that you have arranged.

Chris Grimes:

And has it actually worked, in that you've applied it to an environment in which microplastics are present?

Adarsh Senthilnathan:

Yeah, so that's the next step. So I just recently finished the solution and the article was posted maybe one or two months ago, so the next step is getting it out there. So I'm actively working with some professors and some researchers to help scale my project up.

Chris Grimes:

And I did see it has been published, so there is some interest in your project. I know that that is the case because you sent me the newspaper article where you're featured. Yeah, so the age of 15, there you are doing something viable with an extraordinary piece of kit that you wouldn't expect, that the world would be solved by something as simple as, as I said, a cardboard tube, some aluminium foil and a coffee fother. Yeah, lovely. So I wish you the very best of luck with that. And what are the scientists telling you?

Adarsh Senthilnathan:

so far that you're onto something, or yeah, I mean they think there's potential behind it. So, yeah, I definitely think it could work. I just need to put a little bit more time and focus onto that, but right now I'm more focused on getting like onto all the podcasts and spreading my message that way.

Chris Grimes:

Sure thing, okay. So let's get you onto this podcast then, in order to curate you through the journey and let your wisdom unpack as we go through. So there's going to be a clearing a tree, a lovely juicy storytelling exercise called 5-4-3-2-1. There's going to be some alchemy, some gold, a couple of random squirrels, a cheeky bit of Shakespeare, a golden baton and a cake. So it's all to play for. So, first of all, adarsh Centaur, nathan, what would you say? Your clearing is? Where do you go to get clutter-free, inspirational and able to think?

Adarsh Senthilnathan:

Yeah, so I kind of briefly mentioned it, but I'd say it's the field or, in the UK, the football pitch. I think that's where, that's why I can really find myself. I like whenever I'm playing or whenever I'm just there, you know all the thoughts like they just go away and it's just like me in a ball.

Chris Grimes:

And is it the sort of the existential idea that the football pitch of life is there, a metaphor in there, and that there's lots of positions, lots of goals and targets to be hit at?

Adarsh Senthilnathan:

Yeah, you know, with sports in general, especially football, you can learn a lot of life lessons from it just by watching or even playing itself. You can learn a lot just about life, about your teammates, how you approach the game, and, yeah, that's why I love it so much, because you know you're just with your friends. It's just you guys in a ball. You don't need a lot of equipment to play, you just have fun.

Chris Grimes:

And who's your favorite soccer team, by the way?

Adarsh Senthilnathan:

Oh, my favorite soccer team, I'd have to go with Liverpool.

Chris Grimes:

Excellent. So there you are, speaking from Cerritos. Where abouts is Cerritos, by the way? Is it just a connovation?

Adarsh Senthilnathan:

It's in Los Angeles. Yeah, next to Los Angeles.

Chris Grimes:

And what made you pick Liverpool as the team?

Adarsh Senthilnathan:

Well, maybe pick Liverpool. It was the first when I first started to get into watching soccer. It was the first game that I watched, so I decided to just stick with them and in life's football pitch, what position do you see yourself in? Right now I see myself in the middle of the field. I like to. I'm kind of taking control over my life right now. I'm taking control over my mind, figuring out all the different options that I have around me, where, if I can go forward backwards whatever the case is, I'm just trying to make progress up the field.

Chris Grimes:

So I'm hearing a sort of center forward or striker in there, because you're trying to strike well towards your. You're sort of kicking into the back of the net of your future, top bins for your future. So here we are on your football pitch. Is it a specific football pitch that you'd like to sort of pin a ponytail and a map of, or is it just generically football pitches? Make you happy.

Adarsh Senthilnathan:

I prefer a grass pitch than an ash shelter just because I believe like grass is more natural. I feel like it just flows better and it feels more at home.

Chris Grimes:

And it's easier to be grounded if you're on real grass as well.

Adarsh Senthilnathan:

Yeah.

Chris Grimes:

So you're on the football pitch of life. We can use that as the metaphor, and you can go into that metaphor much deeper if you want to later on. So here we are, then, on the football pitch of life, and let me now arrive with a tree, if you don't mind, in the middle of your football pitch to shake it to see which storytelling apples fall out. So this is where you've been kind enough to have had five minutes to have thought about four things that have shaped you Adarsh, three things that inspire you, two things that never fail to grab your attention and borrowed from the film up, that's the well squirrels. And then the one is a quirky or unusual fact about you. We couldn't possibly know about you until you tell us. So over to you to shake the canopy of your tree as you see fit.

Adarsh Senthilnathan:

Yeah. So I guess we can start off with like the four things that shaped me within my life. And going back to the field in soccer, I think the one thing that shaped me the most that I have, special compared to other people like me, is my teammates and the environment around me. So my teammates I met them approximately like three years ago, just a brand new group of friends, and you know we all love to play soccer. But outside of soccer, you know we're all helping each other out and we're all having fun. And the thing that I love most about my teammates is they're really real. They're like, they're really honest with me. So if I'm doing something right, they'll tell me. If I'm doing something wrong, they'll tell me. They'll never sugarcoat anything. So that's taught me how to be real within my own life. It's taught me how to be honest with myself, and you know there's a lot of friendly banter that goes along there. So it provides me with tough skin because the stuff that happens over there on the pitch with my teammates is going to be a lot harder than the stuff that's going to come at me in life. So if I could take their banter, I can. It's provided me with thick skin to see past the banter, you know. Have fun with it. See that things aren't always so serious in life. And the reason why I love my teammates so much and the reason why they've shaped me to be the person that I am today is because we really bond together outside of the field and we try and help each other a lot. So the reason why, as a team, we stick together on the field but outside we all have our own expertise and things that we're strong in, so we all help each other out. So, for example, a couple of my teammates are really like, knowledgeable when it comes to going to the gym. So they'll take the group of us. We'll go to the gym. They'll teach us like, the right form, the exercises, stuff like that. Me and a couple other people we are at least a little bit more knowledgeable than they are in investing and making money. So you know, we all get together at six o'clock in the morning. We invest in the stock market. We try and see what's best for us, so that we all help each other out. So instead of one person shining at the top, it's all of us coming up together and we're helping each other. We're helping all of each other out, providing we're taking our own strengths and applying it to our lives so that we can get better. So they've had a really big impact on my life because I've learned a lot from them and what they do the best, cause I'm really knowledgeable. I'm really. I have a lot of wisdom, but my wisdom goes more towards life and becoming successful in money and that's what it says. But they have more real or down to earth type of knowledge that I can gain from them. So just by talking to them, listening to them, learning from them, I can gain a lot, and it shaped me to be the person I am today.

Chris Grimes:

And there's a lovely through line of you obviously enjoying being a collaborator in that too, and there's also the allegory of teamwork to make the dream work so together as a sort of collaborative force of energy for success, I really like through the through line of collaboration in there, so you're not just being a sort of maverick one man band in what you're trying to do.

Adarsh Senthilnathan:

Yeah, a lot of people try and take credit like a hundred percent credit for everything in their life. A lot of people try to be like the only person at the top, but I like to give credit where credit is due, because at the end of the day, I wouldn't be here in general, I wouldn't be here on this podcast talking to you, if it wasn't for them to give me the courage, the confidence to be able to reach out to a podcast across the world. It's hard, but they've given me a lot of wisdom. They've grown my skin. I've able to take a lot more hey, I'm able to take a lot more negative stuff towards me and are you the only one of your team that are reaching out to try?

Chris Grimes:

you're trying to sort of put your voice into a platform of speaking to the world where there's only one that's doing that.

Adarsh Senthilnathan:

Yeah, yeah, this, currently, this is essentially my thing. I don't know when else. All my team is doing this, and that's okay because eventually, when I have perfected it, when I have made it to the top, I will be able to maybe spread my knowledge and wisdom to them. They can pass it on and we can help increase our range, our audience, and we can all get to the top together eventually.

Chris Grimes:

And just a quick question how did you find out about this podcast, even to get in touch in the first place?

Adarsh Senthilnathan:

So this podcast. So one thing that I'm really big on is consistency. So obviously my goal was to get on podcasts to get my word across. So one thing that I did every day, and I made no exceptions toward, was to research a minimum of 10 podcasts and make sure that I responsive five. So I'm just going through list and list and list of podcasts, going through their websites, seeing what they're about, and then I'll email and apply to be on five of them every single day. So that way it doesn't matter if I'm having a good day or a bad day, it doesn't matter my mood. That's like discipline, right there, right. So no matter what, I'm making my way I'm making progress, town, the field, essentially to my end goal. So no matter what my mood, environment, any of that, I'm at minimum making five podcasts, five steps forward.

Chris Grimes:

And congratulations in doing that, because you do the math. There's sort of the math success there by being tenacious and keeping consistent and I hope I'm not. You sent me. You've already been on a podcast called Force of Nature, haven't you? No, hang on. What's it called the optimal life with Nate Haber? Am I number two, or have you done many, many more? You are number two. Yes, cashier, number two, please. So I've got a comedy bell for when. Well, I'm delighted to have been the second one and I hope many, many more say yes to you as well. So the third one will be interesting as well. The comedy rule of three will be interesting, whatever the third one is. Anyway, harrah, I'm glad that I became part of your mathematical equation and here we are with you in the Good Listening Two Show. So your first shape is then is the football team and the squad and the collaboration. What would be your second shape, edge?

Adarsh Senthilnathan:

My second one goes back to my microplastic project. So this project I've been working on for a total of two years and I actually I applied this project to like a competition. It's called the Science Fair. I put this project in and, funnily enough, I didn't place in my county. So my county gives an award to the top five people and I didn't even make the top five in my county. Forget about state, national, country, forget about all that I didn't make in the county. And as my mom, as a loving mom, her first reaction was to like soul me. She was like oh, it's okay, maybe think of a new project and we'll try again next year. But in my mind that struck me in the wrong way, because I was like just because I didn't place doesn't mean that the problem is solved. I should continue to focus on this problem, this project, because it doesn't matter how many times I fail, it doesn't matter how many awards that I don't get for the project. At the end of the day, the plastics are still in the ocean. Like me, not doing this project isn't going to stop the plastics from leaving the ocean. So what I did was I worked on it by myself for a year and a half Every single day, minimum of 30 minutes. I'm just working on it no matter what, and it took nine prototypes for me to finally get to this final project. And the thing that shaped me the most is the failure of each prototype, because most people, after losing that science fair, they would have given up, just like my mom said they would have found a new project. I decided to stick with it After the first prototype, when it failed, maybe people started to think maybe this project doesn't work. You know, maybe this is not the one, but I kept going, second, one, third, one, fourth one, all the way up to the ninth one. So the mentality that I built, my resilience to failure and quitting and giving up, the things that I learned from just completing that project itself forget about the project the scientific knowledge I gained, the mental strength and resilience that I gained from failure, from that project that's what shaped me today the most. Because my journey for reaching out to podcasts and really taking action to fulfill my purpose that I started about two years ago. So this project has been with me the whole way. So, as I'm applying to podcasts, as I'm going on to all these things and speaking, I'm actively facing failure. So, like everything that I say I've actually done in my life which gives me essentially the credibility of what I wanted from my microplastic project, so all the failure that's come with that and the mindset that I've gained has helped shape me to the person I am today.

Chris Grimes:

You're in very good company, by the way. You'll have heard the story of Thomas Edison, who invented the light bulb. He spent about 999 different experiments not inventing the light bulb and then there was the magic light bulb moment, when he did invent it. So you're in very good companies that you've only had nine prototypes, but it works, and has it began to work now? Have you put it into an environment Again? I'm really I love the fact that it's actually at its source, a cardboard tube with some aluminium foil and a coffee frother. But have you put it into an environment where there are microplastics present?

Adarsh Senthilnathan:

No, not yet. That's the next step. Apparently, there were small testing in a lab and right now it's working, but we still need to scale it up to make it into like a pond or a lake, for example.

Chris Grimes:

Lovely, so I love that again. The tenacity of through line. Sorry, the through line of tenacity is what I was trying to say. There is really good, so keep on keeping on, and keep on keeping on. Wonderful Third shape edge.

Adarsh Senthilnathan:

The third safe bitch is a little bit more of a personal one, one that's closer to home, closer to the heart, and it was when I was at a young age of about six or seven I'm not too sure to be honest but I was placed in a foster home and that was one of the hardest things in my life. Not because the foster home was obviously hard, but I was blessed and lucky enough to not stay there for long. I was able, my parents were able to take me out and now we're living all happily together. But the reason why that foster home has such a big impact on my life was because at that age you first. That's the age where you first start to find the feeling of love, of affection. That's when, at that age, all your family is loving you, you have friends that you can play with, you know everybody is babying you in a sense. And from going up here to being loved so much and all of a sudden no mom to talk to, no dad to talk to, no siblings, none of that, you're by yourself. That big drop from having everybody, that having no one, that's what impacted me the most and I don't want to use this foster home experience as a sob story or as a sympathy story. I am. I'm grateful that it happened to me. I'm grateful that it happened in my life because that was the start of my journey to gaining, collecting wisdom. It was a start in my journey to finding and fulfilling my purpose in life. It was the very first lesson that I ever learned in life, and it was to never trust anybody and so always back myself, always invest in myself, because at that, at that age, I thought I had everything. You know. I was playing soccer, I was playing games, I was having fun with my family and all of a sudden, before you know it, I bought myself. And that feeling is extremely hard to deal with, especially at that such, at that young of the age. But as time went on, as I've gained more experience, wisdom, knowledge, as I've gotten older, I've started to become more grateful for the experience. I've started to extract more lessons from it that I wouldn't have extracted if I, if I hadn't been there, obviously. So that experience as a whole shaped me, not in a not in a bad way, not in a sympathetic way, not in a sad way, but it shaped me to become a better person. It shaped me to always live my life without any regrets, always go towards something because, at the end of the day, I'm the only person that can make me successful and I'm the only person who can stop me from being successful. I'm the only person you know. It's my choice to send out five emails a day. It's my choice to you know, work on this micro plastic project to gain some credibility in the area. I don't have to do any of that. I could just be going to school like, like a normal person. But I want to make sure that I'm investing all my time and energy to making myself better, to going getting to where I want to be, because obviously I recognize that I am young. I have the energy, I have the time, so I'm going to utilize it well. And it takes sacrifice. Obviously, this foster home experience. It takes skipping out on parties, skipping out on, you know, the high school football games, but at the end of the day, I'm willing to do all those things, I'm willing to make those sacrifices because I want it. I want it that bad. So that experience as a whole has shaped my entire mentality of always backing myself and always investing everything into myself to become better. So that's probably the best thing.

Chris Grimes:

And I'm sorry that that happened for you, and how long a period of your life was it when you were not able to be with your family? Because I was delighted to hear a little while ago you said you did describe your mum as being very loving. So it sounds like you're all back together again now and it's all landed the right way up.

Adarsh Senthilnathan:

Yeah, no, it's perfectly fine. It was the reason why I went wasn't a family radio? I don't actually know the reason why I went. My parents haven't told me Just clearly, clearly. Fine, I respect that decision, but it had nothing to do with love, because even when I was in that home, they still they still were able to reach out to me and they gave me a stuffed animal which I still have today. I keep it, keep it very close, close to my heart, because that's a source of motivation right there, because every time I look at the animal it reminds me of that, of that little boy sitting in that home with no one else to talk to, that little boy who was just learning life for himself. So every time I look at that it pushes me to keep going, on the days where I don't want to send out the emails of the days I don't want to work towards becoming better. That's, that's my source of, that's my source of motivation. It gets me through those things. I was only in the home for maybe a month, a month or so. It was a very short amount of time. I'm extremely blessed and lucky to have made it out so quickly, because I know a lot of people haven't had that same ability to get it up, get out that early. So I'm extremely grateful and blessed for that, for that experience, not only because I was able to get out so early, but for all the lessons that I learned within it.

Chris Grimes:

And in terms of where you're trying to get to. You know, future projection, future focus, football pitch top bins, what would be a sort of in the back of the net goal for you.

Adarsh Senthilnathan:

A top bins goal would just be me, me fulfilling my purpose in life, because it doesn't matter. I always I love talking, I love spending my wisdom, I love learning, I love all those things. But the thing that I want to stick with the most is it doesn't matter how many people that I impacted my life. It could be one person, it could be a million people, but as long as I have impacted someone's life positively, as long as I've inspired somebody, motivated somebody, that's my goal right there. It doesn't have to be a lot of people. One person would be the same thing for me as a million people. So I just want to keep growing. I want to keep getting on podcasts, expanding my audience, expanding my knowledge to eventually get to get to essentially the top of top of my life. Get control.

Chris Grimes:

And the end purpose, sort of the mount. Everyone wants to live atop the mountain. What's the top of the mountain view? What are you trying to head in terms of your purpose?

Adarsh Senthilnathan:

In terms of my purpose. I just want to inspire as many people as I can. I want to impact and affect as many people as I can with my words, Because I have a lot of wisdom that's going to help people get through life. It's going to help them guide themselves. It's going to help them build their mentalities. It's going to help develop them physically. It's going to help them develop them mentally. I have the knowledge and wisdom to make people better. I just want to spread it. Getting to the top of the mountain would just be getting as many as podcasts as I can.

Chris Grimes:

So it's a desire to be a motivational speaker and a global influencer.

Adarsh Senthilnathan:

Yeah, that's correct.

Chris Grimes:

I'm just trying to understand it myself so I can help you and I both articulate it.

Adarsh Senthilnathan:

Yeah, I want to be a speaker. That's essentially my projection. I want to be able to speak on stages. I want to be able to speak to as many people as I can. It doesn't matter the background, race any of that, anybody. My knowledge is for life in general, which we are all living currently. So having such a broad audience is a positive and a good thing for me, because it allows me to just get wherever I. It doesn't restrict me to talking to anyone.

Chris Grimes:

And already the lessons that I can hear that you've learned for yourself are courage, tenacity, optimism and a real desire to keep going. So lovely stuff so far, and I think we're now onto the fourth element to shape you.

Adarsh Senthilnathan:

Yeah. So the fourth element that has shaped my life and who I am today is fun and social media, but specifically Instagram. So we all have I'm not going to say we all, but a majority of us have that problem where we're on Instagram and we're just like catch ourselves scrolling through the posts, through the the dudes scrolling yeah. Yeah, we all catch ourselves scrolling and I was able to get some control over my mind and I was able to identify that as one of my weaknesses, because if I'm spending time scrolling, that's time taken away from developing myself physically, mentally, all of that. So the first step is to identify the problem, which I did. So my problem was scrolling and I tried putting a time limit. It didn't work. It was past the time limit. So one thing that I was able to find a solution towards was following quote pages. So there's a bunch of Instagram accounts and pages that post motivational speeches, videos, quotes from athletes, entrepreneurs, businessmen. So, by following as many of those accounts as I can, every time that I catch myself scrolling, it's all videos like, oh, get off your phone, get to work all videos that are providing. So, even when I'm at my weakest point in the day, even when I am at my weakness, stuff that's holding me back I'm still learning, because I'm still gaining wisdom and knowledge from other people, their quotes, and that's the thing that I love so much about social media and that the way I approach life is obviously my knowledge. It's come from my experiences, right, but I would attribute about 40% of the wisdom to myself. So that's all personal experiences, whether it's the foster home, microplastic soccer, any of that. That's about 40%, but all the other knowledge comes from everybody else. So what I'm extremely good at is listening, and it's one of the skills that I've learned to grasp, and when I'm able to listen to anyone at any time and I'm able to take something positive from them. So, from all these different quotes, pages, athletes, businessmen, motivational speakers talking to me, I'm able to take the best things from what they said, see what fits for me and apply it to my life. So about 60% of my knowledge of wisdom comes from already successful people. So and the thing with Instagram is it's so large, it's such a global base I'm able to pull so much information from everybody else, so many inspirational messages, quotes, things that can help me become better as a person, so that maybe on another podcast like this that I'm applying to the audience and I'm hopefully spreading their messages to the audience I'm taking the best parts of people's life and bringing it into mind and applying it to my soul. So that's shaped me tremendously because it's given me a majority of my knowledge and wisdom, and the best part about it is it's coming from Instagram, something that most people see as a hindrance to their success. I'm turning my weakness into a strength, because now, every time that I'm scrolling on Instagram, I'm learning, I'm getting wisdom, I'm getting motivated, I'm taking in knowledge. So, essentially, one thing that shaped me was the entirety of the world, and having such a global source provides me with unlimited amount of capabilities and opportunities to learn from people, to apply the stuff that they said into my life, take it in for myself, so that when I am on these podcasts, I can help deliver those messages and spread them out. So that, so essentially, the world has shaped me. Social media technology, instagram, has shaped me, and most people see social media as a negative, which it can be, but if you actually identify the problem and take essentially control of your life, you can turn that negative into a positive, the weakness into the strength. So even when I am scrolling, I'm getting better. So that's probably one of the biggest things that shaped me in my life, besides the other things.

Chris Grimes:

I like the perfect antidote to doom scrolling, which is brain food scrolling, your brain scrolling, because you're very selective about where you're going inside your head, as of what it is you're scrolling down through and we'll get on to a leadership quote or a quote that's given you sucker, so we'll get on to what your favorite quote of the moment might be from what you're absorbing. So you're a sort of learning, you're a motivational sponge, you're sort of learning from the world and absorbing it in order to help you with your protection of self. Okay, so now, three things that inspire you. Adarsh, if there's any overlap, don't worry, but that's lovely shape so far. Three things that inspire you now.

Adarsh Senthilnathan:

Yeah. So the first thing that would inspire me is my parents. Most people say their parents obviously just the parents dad, mom. They work extremely hard. But the thing that inspires me most about my parents is their journey, because both of them were raised and brought up in India and they don't come from rich families. They come from very poor families and my dad was sent to America with $50 in his pocket. Obviously, america is an expensive country. He came with my mom, so it's and at that time neither of them had jobs. So my dad and my mom are both living in America currently, or this a lot of years ago, but in this in the story they're both living currently with $50 in their pocket, in a brand new country. They barely know the English language. They learned it from their, from their college back in India. But their story is super inspiring to me because my dad was able to secure a job a couple months later, but my mom didn't get a job until a couple years. So my dad not only had to take care of himself, not only did he have to take care of all the bills. He was the only financial source, so he had to take care of food, the bills, the home. He had to take care of himself my mom as well and the main reason that his parents sent him to India so that he could get a better life and help them back out. So he not only did they have to take care of himself, he also had to provide like remittances. He had to send money back to his home so that he can take care of his parents. So my dad had the weight of not only his entire family, but my mom as well and himself, and it was just him. He was the only financial source of income at that time. So it's really inspiring to me because they took so many risks when they came first, came here and even now both my parents are working extremely hard. They work hours and hours on end. They're always in meetings, talking, trying to get better, and the thing is they make a fair bit of income. Now they make a lot of money, but none of that money ever goes to them. You'll never catch my mom in a nail salon. You'll never catch my dad buying new clothes. Every time we go to a restaurant, they're always looking at the cheapest thing on the menu and I asked them why don't you buy it? I know you can buy it for yourself, why don't you buy it? And my mom said that because she would rather invest the money into my knowledge, my education, my ability to play soccer. So that itself is such an inspiration to me because if I didn't chase my dreams, if I didn't make it, if I didn't put my time and energy into making it onto these podcasts and filling my purpose, it would be a disrespect to their entire journey of America and taking care of me. So that itself is inspiring. And most people in life they look for motivation. Motivation is great, motivation is good, but it's only good for a certain amount of time. But the thing is, the motivation is relying in your family, because obviously I don't want my mom to pick the cheapest thing on the menu, I want my mom to take care of herself, I want my dad to buy new clothes. So my motivation comes from my parents. My inspiration comes from my parents. I don't necessarily want to be like them, but I'm going to learn so much from them and their journey itself has inspired me so much, because they essentially came from nothing and they were able to invest everything into me so that I could have a chance and opportunity at this world, so it would be a disrespect to them if I didn't try my very best.

Chris Grimes:

And do you have brothers and sisters as well, or they're all focused very much on your development?

Adarsh Senthilnathan:

I do. I have an older sister right now she's in college. She's a junior year of college.

Chris Grimes:

That's a lovely source of inspiration. Thank you so much. Now, another thing that might have inspired you.

Adarsh Senthilnathan:

Another thing that inspires me sounds a little bit selfish, but it's myself. No, that's fine, like the progress that I've made inspires me. So every time I reach out to a podcast and they respond back to me, that's progress right there and that inspires me. So when I first got into my first podcast, now in my head I'm thinking, oh, I can do that now, so it inspires me to keep going. And I landed this podcast. Oh, I landed two podcasts. Now I can get a third, I landed four, I can get a fifth and I just keep going. So my growth, my progress, my journey inspires me.

Chris Grimes:

Presumably podcasts aren't the end game of your platform. Presumably you'd like to be doing TED Talks and you want to be on a global stage. Really Do you want your own sort of foundation? You want your own company someday as well?

Adarsh Senthilnathan:

You know, whatever, wherever life takes me, I'm always, I'm always going to go into to anything, because at the end day I leave. I leave everything up to God. So wherever he takes me, wherever, whatever is destined in my future, I'll take full advantage of any opportunity that I get and third inspiration. My third inspiration. It it's gonna have a little bit overlap with the, with the, the four things that shaped me. Essentially it's the world again and but it's it's in a different viewpoint or a different sense this time. Because when, when, when you're surrounded with a friend group and social media because on social media everybody only posts the good things, right, whenever you're looking, no one posts the failures, no one posts them like losing a race, they'll post them winning. They'll post the successes. So when you're looking at social media, you're seeing all of these people winning, and most people on they kind of get jealous of that. And I'm not saying that I never get. I never get jealous in life. But one thing that inspires me is other people's successes, because if they're able to do it, so am I, and their success, their successes, especially my friends. Like the people that I grew up with, I'm never gonna be jealous of anything that they ever do. I'm never gonna be jealous of their Successes because I'm happy for them, I'm proud for them. If anything, I'm not jealous, I'm just inspired by their work. I'm them. Winning inspires me to do more. It inspires me to get better. Every time they in a game, say, my friend scores three goals. I'm not jealous of him. That's just gonna inspire me to try and score as well. So it's, I'm inspired by my friends. I'm inspired by, I'm inspired by social media, instagram, the world, and having such going back, having such a Big source of inspiration, motivation, having such a big source of knowledge, is extremely powerful in my life because I'm Always learning, no matter what time of day it is, because even my friends aren't winning, someone else out there on social media has posted them winning and that's gonna inspire me and it's gonna help me get better progress, develop and yeah, so that's probably my source of inspiration. My third one Lovely, great stuff.

Chris Grimes:

now we're on to two squirrels. You know what never fails to grab your attention, irrespective of anything else that may be going on for you oh squirrels. So what are your squirrels of distraction adage.

Adarsh Senthilnathan:

Yeah. So one thing that never fails to grab my attention is People who have essentially had their back against the wall. I'm not sure if you heard that phrase. Back against the wall, yeah, but essentially it's when the only option is forward. Um so one, one perfect example of this is um Person like struggling in life, a person Maybe, let's say, a dad, who's trying to provide for his family. His back is against the wall because if he doesn't work, if he doesn't continue to get better, there's not gonna be food on the plate, there's not gonna be a roof over his head. So his back against the wall. And I never, I always, am able to look at those people who have had their back Into the war and get inspired. And it's applied to my life, obviously in a different way. Um, my back is against the wall. I'm gonna be completely honest. I live in a perfectly good home. I live with loving parents, a loving family, supportive friends, and you know there's a lot of successful people in the world that say, oh, the best, the most successful people are people who've had their back Against the wall. And that struck a thought in my head. So like, so, just because I don't have my bag in. So what doesn't mean that I can't be successful, and I know. So. What I decided to do was I decided to actually put my back against the wall, but in a more figurative and Mentally perspective. Because if I didn't chase my dreams, if I didn't work towards getting on these podcasts, if I didn't work to fulfill my purpose, then I would have to take the normal route of going into college. I would have to take the normal route of following the, the education path that most high schoolers and 16 year olds and 15 year olds in the, in the US and the UK take themselves. But one thing that I pride myself the most about is going against the grain, going against what everybody else is doing. So if everybody else is going left, I'm going right because, realistically, nobody else is Talking on podcasts and having so much confidence in themselves. But the reason why I'm so confident is because I I've prepared, and confidence comes from preparation, that comes from hard work, and I know for myself in my heart that I've done the work. I've went through the experiences, I've won through the failures. I've gained all of that. So one thing that never fails to grab my attention is other people who have also had their back against the wall. So I can learn from their stories. I can learn how they apply themselves to the situations, how they've made it out, stuff like that.

Chris Grimes:

And, by the way, a quote which might really help you, which you probably know, which is do what you can with what you have where you are now, and that works in the bad times and the good times, even when you're right at the top of the mountain. Do what you can with what you have where you are now and At all points in between in your life. That's a really good mantra, which I, a previous guest of just over a week ago, actually said on the show, so I learned that as a sort of inspirational quote to share with you now. Thank you Another squirrel of distraction.

Adarsh Senthilnathan:

Another thing that never fails to grab my attention would be People at the gym, because going to the gym is is extremely it's a mentally tough thing more than it is a physically tough thing, because If you go to the gym for a day, you're not going to see any progress. If you go for a week, you won't see anything. If you go for a month, you'll start to see a little bit, but if you take one day off, that'll set you back an entire month and it's going to the gym is all about your mindset. So every time that I go to the gym, I always respect everybody in there and I always I always fail. I never fail to acknowledge all those people, because I understand that they're taking time out of the day, they're using their utilizing discipline to work on themselves, to get, you know, physically stronger, to get a little bit more healthier, and even if they're not Seeing any physical benefits, they're still going, and that's something mentally strong, especially for the human race, because the humans were just designed to want results, were designed for the, the, the end goal. We're always looking towards a goal that sometimes we forget to actually look at the journey and it's and appreciate the journey. So it's something that I I'm taking into my life, like right now as we speak, because Obviously, I'm extremely grateful and appreciative that I'm talking to you on this podcast and, like deep inside, I'm really happy that I'm able to be here and spread my message and talk to your audience. But I'm also grateful and appreciative for the journey of me getting on to this podcast. You know I had to send out the email, reach out to you and every day that consistency, I'm trying to appreciate and love the journey more than I am. The result and Going back to the gym that's extremely important. And the going to the gym is mentally hard because not only do you have to push yourself when you're there, you have to push yourself to actually arrive at the gym. That's discipline right there, that's consistency, you know. Going to the gym. It's not easy. Most people go early, early mornings or late-night nights just because they have work in the middle of the day. So it's just I'm inspiring. I always acknowledge and respect the people who do those, because I understand that they don't have to it's it's a personal choice. They do it to help better themselves, the better they are. They do it to help better themselves, develop themselves, so that they can help provide for their families, for their friends. Yeah, it's one thing that I really respect.

Chris Grimes:

There's another quote for you, which is there's no shortcut to success. Tomorrow we go again get up, wash, rinse, repeat. Get up, wash, rinse, repeat, keep tenacious. It links beautifully to your through line of keeping going with your emails, keeping going with your movement forward, even though your back is or isn't against the wall, keep on moving. Wonderful. And now a quicker, unusual fact about you a darsher. You couldn't possibly know about you until you tell us I have.

Adarsh Senthilnathan:

One fun fact that you might not know about me is I'm a pianist. I I've been playing piano for about maybe 11 years and I'm not a very talented one, but I work hard to become better. And the thing that I love most about piano is in of. Here in America we have we have something called a certificate of merit, so essentially it's a ten different levels of piano. In order to get to the next level you have to take a test. So that test is like theory, playing songs, and once you reach like the top of the level, level 10, you're you've essentially completed piano here in America. So, like, once you reach level 10, you can play piano and you can take the test in any way you want. You can skip levels, your past levels. So when I was in seventh grade so maybe two, three years ago, I Was able to I decided that it was best for myself to skip a level. So, as I went straight from level seven to level nine and I worked the entire year for that test, I worked really hard, I prepared for it and I failed it I got nowhere close to passing that and you know, obviously it hurt, one because I failed the test, but two, because I spent the past year preparing for that test and Putting a year's worth of work to something. Just for it to not to work out is extremely hard to deal with, especially at that age, because Obviously, humans we love the results so much. What if the results not there? You just spent a whole year working towards failing the test, so that that was really hard. But my mom obviously just kind of mad because piano costs money. Right, she's investing that money to get the piano lessons taking the test. And the thing is I wasn't that phased by the stuff that my mom said. Most importantly, because I Always learned to invest in myself and back myself. So even if I didn't get the result that I was looking for, even though I didn't pass the test, I was able to get that mindset within me that, no matter what, no matter how many people don't believe in me, no matter how hard the goal is, no matter how hard the journey and destination is, I'm willing to take the chance on myself, I'm willing to invest in myself and I will always back myself, no matter what battle it is in life, because I believe that I can win any battle and even though at the end I might not win. I've made so much more progress with the mentality that I can win, then progress with the mentality that I can't. Because if I came into this test with, oh, I'm not gonna pass this test, I wouldn't have put any work towards it, so my progress would be from here to here. But since I had the mentality that I could win, I could do it, I could back myself, I invested myself. My progress went from here to here. So even though I didn't get the result, I wanted the progress that I made within that, that self development, the personal development, being honest with myself. I made so much more progress that that itself was a success to me, because even though I didn't pass the test, I was able to learn so much. I took it on to the next year. I passed the test the next year.

Chris Grimes:

So I was going to ask what happened because I could be being at all your story and where, why you wanted to do it. It didn't seem like you'd be satisfied with not passing, so I'm delighted here that you have yeah now second, like passing a driving test you pass second time or third time. You pass second time, so you're now great nine piano.

Adarsh Senthilnathan:

Yeah, and then the next year I took level 10. I passed that and I'm now done with piano. So yeah, but the thing was a good night. Yes, yeah, the thing with me. The one of the things that my mom had said to me was to never leave on a failure, and essentially what that meant to me was just never give up. So it doesn't matter how many times I lose failure, I'm gonna keep going until I make it, and I've showed that many times in my life, whether it's micro plastics, whether it's just piano, whether it's in soccer. I just take that to heart and that's, that's um, something that I'll take on for the rest of my life, no matter if I'm speaking, working, anything that I ever do for the rest of my life, it's something that I'll always take with me.

Chris Grimes:

We've shaken your tree, hara, so now we're going to go alchemy in gold when you're at purpose and inflow. What are you absolutely happiest doing, adarsh?

Adarsh Senthilnathan:

um, I'm happy talking. You know, I really love talking. Um, it doesn't matter who I'm talking to, where I'm talking, I just love talking. Sometimes I find someone's joy in just talking to myself and it's it's consistency, right, because when you're on these podcasts there's there's no script, there's nothing to go off of, it's all from the top of your head, right? So one thing that I do to better help prepare myself is I go back to consistency and every single day I just talk to thin air. Um, I'll pick so during the mornings or when I'm at school, I'll go on instagram and I'll pick a video or a quote that has a message that I feel passionate about, a message that I can relate with. I'll pick that, save it for the end of the day. At the end of the day, I'll spend about 30 minutes just talking about it to nobody, to absolutely nobody. I'll just be walking back and forth in my garage kicking the soccer ball while I'm at it, just talking to air, and you know that's that's what I'm happy doing. I love doing that and you know it's gonna feel weird to people. It's gonna be, it's gonna. People are gonna call me a lunatic. They're good. If they actually see me do it. They'll think I'm crazy, but when people start to doubt you, when people start to not believe in you, that's when you know you're in the right place.

Chris Grimes:

Lovely, sage advice, and it makes a complete sense that you're just seeking in life a platform to speak your knowledge and your truth, even if in the moment it's thin air. But you're still making progress because you're becoming expert in the topic of choice that you've decided to spout into thin air. So you're a you're a natural born communicator. Born. You're here to communicate.

Adarsh Senthilnathan:

Yeah, it also goes back to Confidence. The reason why I'm able to. I'm 16 years old. I'm speaking like I am on 50. I'm speaking like I've already died and I'm living a one more life. But the reason why I am so confident Is because confidence comes from the work that you've put before and I I know that I've put in the work. How, because I spent those nights, every single day, talking to myself like I was on a podcast. I spent those nights sending out the email. So now I can present myself in such a confident way Because I'm 15 years old. I respectfully I don't just I most I shouldn't be here talking to you with all this wisdom and knowledge. I shouldn't be here trying to motivate and inspire people. But I'm so confident in my ability and my knowledge and my wisdom Because I'm I love what I'm doing, because I'm so happy Working on every single day and its consistency. I you can't miss a day Because, essentially, if you're like there's no, you don't have a rocket ship going up into space and all of a sudden just stops. You know the boosters and the rockets and the engines will go on forever. You can't just cut the engine off for a day or two, it has to be on the whole time and I, I take that and I apply it to my life and I I'll never miss a day, doesn't matter how sick I am, sad, I am, happy, I am. I will always do it and it's it's what's gonna help me get to where I want to be, and the best part about it is that I'm happy doing it, I love doing it and I just get to fulfill my purpose.

Chris Grimes:

And adarsh never has a day off, is what I'm hearing is a mantra Okay, we're gonna award you with a cake now Hurrah, this is the sort of last multi layered construct, so this is where you're gonna get to put a cherry on the cake. So now, what's a favorite inspirational quote that's always given you sucker adarsh and pull you towards your future?

Adarsh Senthilnathan:

all right, um, this might be recency bias, just because I heard it a couple days ago, but but one quote that I've liked is it's from Usain Bolt. He's an olympic runner, a very world record runner, yeah, and his quote was I trained four years to run nine seconds and you know, that's that's really inspiring to me. I've done my, you know. It talks to me about dark work, because we didn't see the training that he did. We didn't see at the times of day he did the training, we didn't see how hard he was training. Because when you're an athlete like that, not only do you have to put in the work. When you're running, you have to do the strength training, the mental training, you have to watch your diet. You can't be drinking alcohol, you have to watch out for the parties. It's consistency, it's it's it's a discipline, it's a long journey, it's a hard journey. He's obviously by himself, um, because that nine seconds, he's referring back to his world record when he was by himself sprinting.

Chris Grimes:

so, training four years to run nine seconds, that's that that quote hits an expression that I read about you using, but you haven't used it yet. You said dark work, and that's where you talk about the hard work that's underneath the surface. Still waters run deep. The dark work is the effort, the tenacity the work.

Adarsh Senthilnathan:

Yeah, dark work is all of the work that's done, um, when nobody's watching. It's done at the times when nobody else wants to do the work. The the work itself is the stuff that nobody else wants to do Because, respectfully, nobody else wants to send out emails in the morning when everybody else is out having fun. Nobody wants to talk to thin air like a, like a crazy lunatic on the street. Nobody wants to work so hard for a project just to deny like nobody's willing to go through failure after failure. You have to failure, and the reason why I love that quote so much is because after that quote it's not included in the quote, but after, when he said that it was like I trained four years to run nine seconds but most people would have given up after two months, yes, and that I will keep that with me for for probably the rest of my life, and it applies to my life every single day. And I've done my listening, I've done my learning over the past few years and I will continue to learn every single day for the rest of my life. But it's my time to talk now. That night it's. It's my nine seconds now, so I'm gonna get on as many parts as I can. It's it's my time to talk. I've done the learning and listening to gain the knowledge. It's my time to spread it out. So I've done the training, so now it's my time to run the race.

Chris Grimes:

It's like 20,000 hours to achieve mastery sounds like it underneath the surface. You've been doing the artwork of your 20,000 hours, which is great too. Exactly Okay, what's the best piece of advice you've ever been given? Adage best piece.

Adarsh Senthilnathan:

It's it's probably to not have any regrets in my life and that that advice can be taken in in multiple different pathways. But the two pathways that I've been able to identify, at least, was the first pathway which most people take. It is if I live my life with no regrets, that means, oh, I can go, I be reckless, try anything, I'm gonna. I'm gonna do this, I'm gonna do that. Live my life with no regrets, I'm gonna have fun over here, have fun over there, try out all these new experiences, vacations. So most people take having no regrets in life that way spending money, stuff like that. But the way that I take it is to Take full responsibility of my actions and to make sure that every single day, every single moment, every minute second that I make the best decision and action for myself that can help push me forward in life, so that in the future I won't have any regrets because a deep down in my heart, in my mind, I'll know that for a fact. I put my everything into becoming successful and impacting the world. And the reason why that's my favorite quote is because I don't regret any of the actions I take, any of my life anymore, because anything that I did in the past. At that time I thought it was the best for me. I thought it was the thing that would help me get better. So even at the end it didn't work out. I don't regret that action because at that time I thought it was the best for me. So if I continue to live my life that way, I'll be able to essentially fulfill the quote and not live my life with any regrets.

Chris Grimes:

Which speaks again, by the way to do what you have with what you have. Where you are now. Again, I'm not trying to just repeat that, but that that's really well. With with, because then it made sense, now it makes sense. So at all points it makes sense to do with what you've got, where you are now, exactly and okay. So we're going to ramp up to Shakespeare quite soon and, and just before we get there, we're going to talk about legacy with Shakespeare. This is the past. The golden baton moment, please. Who in your network do you think would most appreciate, like or enjoy being given a good listening to by you passing the golden baton on to them?

Adarsh Senthilnathan:

I think I like to pass the little bit on to tonight, Haber, because, just just like you, he was willing to take a chance on me as such a young age. Most people they read my email, they just dismiss it. But but him and you you both of you guys were able to take a chance on me. You guys had the ability to open your minds and continue that yes and mentality that you mentioned previously on the podcast. So, yeah, I think he'd be a great fit. He has a lot of wisdom and knowledge that he can speak on life and, yeah, thank you very much indeed.

Chris Grimes:

And now, inspired by the complete works of Shakespeare, borrowing from the seven ages of man's speech all the worlds of stage and all the men and women merely players. This is your opportunity now, adarsh, to talk about legacy, and I know you've only just started on a path that you've been working very hard on, and it'll be intriguing to sort of retune into where you are in 5, 10, 15,. You know, as you go on through your path, it is not over until it's over, and you've got a long way to go yet in a good way. So, legacy, how, and all is said and done, do you think you'd most like to be remembered?

Adarsh Senthilnathan:

I like to be remembered for my, my wisdom and my knowledge in life. I would like to be remembered for going against the grain and the typical flow of somebody in life. I would like to be remembered for like removing all of the limitations that I had on myself and other people put on me and gaining control over my life and my mind. And, most importantly, I think I would like to be remembered as Adarsh Sampal Nathan, someone who was able to speak around the world to help influence society and help them create and formulate like bulletproof mindsets that have changed their families lives around. So I want my essentially, I want my legacy to live on through all the people that I've affected, even in the slightest of ways, even though it was like extremely minor. I would like my legacy to live on with them and I want those people to spread the wisdom and the knowledge that they've gained to their audience, their families, their friends, so that, no matter what, like our society will never be weak again. So I'm just simply someone who carries and influences the message, but it's the people who have taken my message up high to their life and spread it who are the most important. So I want my legacy to live on within them.

Chris Grimes:

So, adarsh Sampal Nathan, where can we find out all about you? On the internet?

Adarsh Senthilnathan:

Yeah. So right now, obviously I'm a growing, I'm a growing source. I'm just starting out. So you can find me on different podcasts. The first podcast is obviously the optimal life. You can now find me on this podcast. You can find me on some articles about my microplastic project. But I'd say, most importantly, just stay tuned, because if you truly are yeah, if you truly are passionate about making a change in your life, if you're passionate about working hard for something to make your life better, to train around, for your family and for yourself, then you'll take the knowledge and the wisdom that have been passed on by me and apply it to your life. So I just say, follow my journey. I'm going to keep on trying my best to get onto as many podcasts as I can, each podcast. I don't repeat information, which is kind of why I didn't mention dark work, but it's a true. I'm glad that you brought it up because I think it'd be beneficial for your audience to hear. But I try not to repeat information on the podcast that I go on, because not only do I have so much information that I have the ability to do that, but if I don't repeat any information, it makes it a lot easier for the people who are actually dedicated and determined to change their life around, so that now, when they follow my journey, they listen to the podcast, they'll get something new, something to take home like a new lesson with them forever.

Chris Grimes:

And, by the way, adarsh Senthal Nathan, stay tuned. If you ever do your own podcast which is an obvious thing you maybe should do there's a title for you which is your own inner genius speaking to the world. Stay tuned. I love the fact that there's more to come. You have not finished. My work here is not done. Thank you Wonderful. Thank you so much. I'm just going to stop recording there in a moment, but check out if you have been listening as well. The website is thegoodlisteningtujocom. As this has been your moment in the sunshine at Adarsh Senthal Nathan, is there anything else you'd like to say?

Adarsh Senthilnathan:

Yeah, I speak with passion and purpose and I'm here to make an impact on the world and my name isn't going anywhere for the next time. I'm going to continue to keep going, continue to spread my message. I only speak real wisdom to real people. So, if you truly want it, you'll follow the journey, you'll follow the podcast, you'll connect them all together to gain all the information that you can to get better. I guess for all speaking, inquiries and articles. You can reach out to me and find me at adarshsenthalnathanjmlocom. That's just my first and last name, all lowercase, no spaces. So if you could send an email to me, I'd be happy to hop on any podcast, any time, any article, just to spread my message. Get my name out there, so to the audience. I guess I just want to leave you with one last message or thing that you can obtain from this podcast is losers don't lose because they fail. They lose because they quit after failing, and winners aren't people who win, they're people who just never gave up after they lost, and I think that's what I want to wrap up today with.

Chris Grimes:

Adarshsenthalnathan, drop the mic. Good night. You've been listening to the Good Listening 2 show here on UK Health Radio with me, chris Grimes oh, it's my son. If you've enjoyed the show, then please do tune in next week to listen to more stories from the clearing. If you'd like to connect with me on LinkedIn, then please do so. There's also a dedicated Facebook group for the show too. You can contact me about the programme or, if you'd be interested in experiencing some personal impact coaching with me, carry my level up your impact programme. That's chrisatsecondcurveuk. On Twitter and Instagram, it's at thatchrisgrimes. So until next time for me, chris Grimes, from UK Health Radio. I'm from Stan. To your good health and goodbye.

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